Help Prevent Burnout on Your Team:

Help Prevent Burnout on Your Team

Burnout is rarely an individual phenomenon; fixing and preventing it requires leadership. You can help your team thrive by implementing the following advice.

WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS

  • The signs of burnout are obvious in some people but subtle in others. Keep n eye out for tiredness, lack of focus, depressed mood, hostility, and expressions of hopelessness.
  • Regularly check in with team members to gauge their physical, cognitive and emotional energy.

SET LIMITS ON WORKLOADS

  • Talk to your team about its collective capacity, and ensure that assignments and deadlines don’t exceed it.
  • Shield your team from external pressures, including unreasonable or unclear client and management demands.

INSIST ON RENEWAL      

  • Communicate that optimal performance depends on rest and renewal. Encourage people to set sensible limits on work hours.
  • Set an example by keeping reasonable hours yourself.
  • Make sure your team members take their full vacation time.

BOOST CONTROL

  • Clarify expectations; grant flexibility on where, when, and how people get work done.
  • Advocate for the resources your team needs to perform.
  • Create uninterrupted time for people to make progress on important tasks.

MAKE RECOGNITION MEANINGFUL

  • Regularly highlight wins and successes, even small ones.
  • Recognize and reward people for helping others.
  • Note the positive impact of your team’s work on others.

EMPHASIZE LEARNING

  • Routinely ask team members about their development goals and what resources are required to achieve them.
  • Share what you’re learning and how you’re doing it.

FACILITATE MUTUAL SUPPORT

  • Talk regularly about progress toward team goals.
  • At team meetings, ask what assistance people need and can offer one another.
  • Be open about asking for and giving support.

BUILD COMMUNITY        

  • Don’t tolerate incivility on your team. Set an example for respectful, compassionate behavior toward others.
  • Encourage people to share what’s happening in their lives outside of work.
Courtesy : HBR Nov 2016 Issue